hope

Hope: foe or ally?

by Admin on

How long can a man survive without hope? If all hope was to be lost, would you live to see the next minute?

<em>take a man’s hope away and you take away his will to live.

The longest time breath held voluntarily (male) is 24 min 3.45 secs and was achieved by Aleix Segura Vendrell (Spain), in Barcelona, Spain, on 28 February 2016.

Aleix Segura Vendrell is a professional freediver. The attempt took place at the 17th Mediterranean Dive Show. (source: http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/longest-time-breath-held-voluntarily-(male)

Humans cannot survive without oxygen. science has taught us that after about 6 minutes, the brain begins to die irreversibly if deprived of oxygen. How Vendrell achieved such feat is breath-taking literally! maybe science needs a review, as usual.

How long can a man survive without hope? If all hope was to be lost, would you live to see the next minute? It is impossible to answer this question correctly unless you’ve lost ALL hope at least once. Those who may have been able to help us are those who have taken their own lives in an irreversible act of suicide, but unfortunately they are no longer with us.

while there is life, there is hope.

There is that constant feeling that things will get better, that even if they don’t we will get better and find other ways to survive. Hope is a man’s best friend, a frustrated soul is quick to turn and cling to some fibres of hope, some wish that a turn around might be just around the corner.

I work in the hospital, and it is a daily affair to see people filled with hopes of recovery either for themselves or for a relative. Sometimes, hope delivers and meets expectations, other times, it doesn’t show up. Even at that, people still cling to it. They are quick to invoke a close cousin of hope, Fate. So often do we resort to fate whenever hope falls short. We accept and move on.


protracted hope wearies the soul.

Euthanasia is a difficult topic and raises a lot of ethical debate, many thanks to hope.
One time at work, a pregnant woman was to be operated upon urgently to ensure she and her baby stay fine. After the operation which I was a part of, the baby who at the time of delivery wasn’t responding as expected was still not showing any signs of improvement. The baby had already been resuscitated promptly by every means available. After a few more tries, the baby was still blue. We had done our best and hoped the supporting system instituted for the baby would eventually work. About 30 minutes later, there was a constant loud cry coming from the ward, it was the same baby, now all pink and responsive, as though nothing was ever wrong.
That example will make me always hang on for every other unresponsive baby, because, who knows, it just might make it too. No matter how many babies fail to make it eventually, the memory of that one who made it will breed hope.

Miracles, testimonies of turn-arounds breed hope and make people wait situations out. Hope is strongest when there are no other options. It is the currency of the penniless – more rightly, It is the currency of us all, most palpable when we’re down and out.

Situations that could easily have been put an end to linger and continue because we wait it out and cling to hope. This is no argument to support suicide or an attempt of it, but rather, situations of the living that we should totally turn our backs on. Let me give you a few examples:

Josephine has lost an arm, four teeth and all her pride. She related her ordeal yesterday, when we realised her wounds were inflicted on her by her husband. It’s been going on for 5 years, she had hoped he’ll change.

Coker has been married for four years now, with children. He wants a divorce. He can’t cope any longer. His spouse has remained the careless woman she has always been. He knew this even before they got married, he thought she’d outgrow it and become more responsible when she becomes a mother. He had hoped she’ll change.

Lanre left home at 5am on saturday morning. He was bent on getting fuel at all cost regardless of the fuel scarcity. He was confident that his early rise will yield. His fuel tank gauge was already lit with the warning sign. A hundred (100) meters later, he passed a filling station already having about 50 cars waiting in line even when the station was yet to open. “Just turn around and go home”, an inner voice told him. No, i’ll just check the next one, he thought. He repeated this thought at 1000m, 2000m and 5000m. The car has finally come to a halt and won’t start. It’s 5.45am and lanre has begun a compulsory jogging back home. He had hoped he’ll find fuel.

Fidelis has now made it to his final year in the 7th year of his 4 year course. He has the many industrial strikes and political ineptitude to thank for that. He finished top of his class and as the best graduating student in the university that year. His parents are well to do and had plans lined up for him to get additional qualifications outside the country. Fidelis was too patriotic for his parent’s liking. It is the reason he was just graduating after rejecting an opportunity to study abroad for his first degree. He has definitely learnt his lessons now, his dad told his mother at his convocation. Fidelis has hope to blame for staying back and finishing late; the same hope he clung to at the times he almost lost it. he had thought the new government were going to fulfill their promises.

Hope that here will soon be better is what keeps us from going there; hope that there will be greener, is what pushes us away from here.
Hope is a pill that must be taken for the right ailment, lest it becomes poison.

Yet, hope may really not be the problem or the enemy; but “hope in what or who” speaks volumes.
as long as hope lies in things uncertain and things powerless, it will shatter or be shattered, occasionally it will yield.
As for me, my hope is nowhere near this world or any of the things or people in it, not even myself. I have found undwindling hope, self-kindling in fact, in God alone, powered by Jesus, the Christ.

Sing with me if you will,

My hope is built on nothing else
Than Jesus’ blood and righteousness
I dare not trust the sweetest frame
But wholly lean on Jesus name
On Christ the solid rock I stand
All other ground is sinking sand.

I wish you the kind of hope that makes not ashamed.

Oluwatosin Fatade

Go MAD(make a difference)!

by Admin on

How to go M.A.D (make a difference)

The skies don’t seem so dark as before; but rather than soothe, it scares me. In its whole visible extent from where I stand tonight; there’s not a star in sight, and the moon: absent. While I wondered what other occasion made the moon stand me up, the lights went off. Yes, electricity –still happens around here sadly. I mentioned the moon stood me up, we’ve been keeping up appearances in the past few days, basically she shows up in different attires and I take shots. I have her all saved in my memory in full, half, and crescent garments. Not more than fifteen blinks after the darkness enveloped the area, my thoughts halted at the symphony of starting engines that pierced the silent night. In theory, light travels faster than sound as is the case when lightning precedes a thunderstorm. But tonight, the sound of generators welcomed the much needed lights they gave.

What am I doing out here in the night anyway? Let me tell you about it.

I was going home from work after a long day that almost refused to end, (I could bet the second hand of the clock took some anticlockwise turns repeatedly), and there was this thought that refused to leave my mind. The thought practically let itself in and felt at home uninvited. There wasn’t a thing I could do about it – I washed, did dishes, arranged and even slept but it was right there even in my waking moment, so I finally had to say hi. So it’s been making rounds in my head ever since and I’m going to have to talk about it like right now.

No one can or will ever change the world.

I promise you that I fought this thought with everything I had, I took several mental trips down history lane – each time I arrived right back at this mind-boggling thought. This thought seems to stand alone against every hope mantra of making the world a better place that I have known.

If you intend to clothe a few children at the orphanage, do so only after there’s no kid on your street without decent clothes on.

If you’re going to feed a nearby village or community, it would make no sense if someone is dying of hunger at your corridor.

Don’t start an education endowment fund or scholarship for strangers when some of your own people cannot afford school.

As a rule of thumb, don’t go about cleaning the community gutter when your room’s a mess – that’s hypocrisy, showmanship and gross attention-seeking.

It’s been said times over that if everyone cleaned their front yard, the whole town would be clean. Hard to argue against that.

Let’s quit burning an area of land in preparation for Tree-Planting to support a campaign to end global warming. Driving a car that’ll give off fumes to such an event should be criminal, but how evitable is that? As long as we keep up with the sources of our problems, finding solutions will always be beyond reach, a never ending race.

If at least one relative whether near or distant stood up for each child that lost one or both parents, orphanages wouldn’t exist. But it seems to be the way of the world to first create a problem and afterwards begin a never-ending race of finding solutions.
Whatever your grand plans and lofty ideas, let your homefront, your locale be your testing ground. Run your trials there and turn out successful before you unleash on the unsuspecting world.
Nothing ridicules a great speech like dissenting voices of the speaker’s household in the audience.

Without trying to belittle or make light of the efforts of great men and women who have made tremendous impact, I make bold to say none of them has changed the world; and to be quite frank, none of us ever will. At best, our neighborhood will not forget ever. The size and extent or reach of your ‘neighborhood’ will be your own doing, but definitely not the world. As long as one child still gets mutilated, whoever started the campaign against genital mutilation is yet to change the world. If in doubt of this statement, ask the mutilated child. But if many voices were to fight the cause, changing the world might become possible – no single name however will be able to boast of having changed the world.

Imagine what a good shot of you taken by a photographer with you in your best pose ever would look like…what if you then discover in there that your zipper was wide open the whole time, would you still feel proud of that picture? Little pockets here and there matter, but it is in sync with other pockets that sense is made out of them. Alone, not much is to be said. A bucket of water and an ocean are basically the same in terms of water composition save for volume. If the ocean was to be split into its constituent parts, it’ll never be able to boast.

I believe in Jesus as Saviour and that means I believe he is going to change the world. But as of now, its hope, albeit certain hope. Hope, because it is not yet manifested; certain because it will happen. When he was to start this changing the world campaign, here’s what he did – he saved Jews first, his own people and then the rest of the world. Everything was first to the Jews, before the Gentiles. His disciples who were to carry on with the campaign were commanded to tarry at home, preach at home before moving to the ends of the world. If anyone desires world peace, equity, equality, justice, charity; start from your home. That’s how to change the world: home first, then the world.

Oluwatosin Fatade

%d bloggers like this:
Skip to toolbar